MENU
Back to Sharing Heritage
Back to marngrook

Sharing Heritage in Kulin Country

Table of Contents

			   Contents			        Page
	FOREWORD ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	1

	AUTHORS PREFACE …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	4

	A COLONIAL EXPERIENCE IN RECONCILIATION …………………………………………………………………………………………………………	8

	Two lifetimes spanning three centuries ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………	8
	The heir to a fortune …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	9
	The bareknuckle evangelist ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	11
	Arrival at Port Phillip Colony …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	12
	Major Newman’s war of dispossession ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	14
	The Wurundjeri Extreme Sports Club ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	16
	Sounds like Moomba to me …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	17
	Entering a Hospitality Agreement ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	19
	A daily dialogue between friends ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	21
	Do you mind if we kill the Major ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	24
	An idyllic 1840’s lifestyle …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	26
	Understanding the impacts of colonisation ……………………………………………………………………………………………………	28
	The last initiation at Hanging Rock in 1851 ………………………………………………………………………………………………	30
	The last corroboree at Pound Bend in 1852 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………	31
	Billibilli’s last walkabout …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	32
	Understanding tribal social structure through marngrook ………………………………………………………………	33
	The 150th year football history war ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	35

	MARNGROOK: THE TRIBAL ROOTS OF AUSTRALIAN FOOTBALL ……………………………………………………………………………	38

	The Aboriginal context of Tom Wills’ early years …………………………………………………………………………………	38
	Wills added a new dimension to playing Rugby ……………………………………………………………………………………………	39
	The social context at the birth of Australian football …………………………………………………………………	41
	An era of colonial apartheid ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	42
	The marketing of ‘a game of our own’ …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	43
	The hidden connection between the two games ………………………………………………………………………………………………	45
	Why Wills remained silent about Aboriginal football …………………………………………………………………………	47
	How Marngrook influenced Wills’ playing style …………………………………………………………………………………………	48
	A personal perspective ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	49
	Indigenous football in Western Victoria …………………………………………………………………………………………………………	51
	Indigenous football in Central Victoria …………………………………………………………………………………………………………	52
	Indigenous football in other states ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	55
	Ozkick has been with us for thousands of years ………………………………………………………………………………………	57
	A truly national game then as well as now ……………………………………………………………………………………………………	58
	The socially integrative significance of marngrook ……………………………………………………………………………	59
	The decimation of indigenous population by smallpox …………………………………………………………………………	60
	The social dislocation following the smallpox plague ………………………………………………………………………	62
	How marngrook reflected social structure ………………………………………………………………………………………………………	62
	How marngrook was played …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	64
	Does our language show a link to marngrook? ………………………………………………………………………………………………	66
	The contextual arguments linking the two games ………………………………………………………………………………………	64
	How marngrook survived on the missions ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………	68
	Official football history continues to ignore context ……………………………………………………………………	67
	The idea of Terra Nullius still influences thinking …………………………………………………………………………	71

	WANDIJINISM – THE HUMANIST RELIGION ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	75

	Why indigenous religion has remained unexplored ……………………………………………………………………………………	75
	The active denigration of Aboriginal culture ……………………………………………………………………………………………	76
	Wandjinism as a universal religion in Australia ……………………………………………………………………………………	78
	The idea of human pre-existence not afterlife …………………………………………………………………………………………	81
	The dead live on in the dreaming of the living…………………………………………………………………………………………	82
	The concept of a non-interventionist God ………………………………………………………………………………………………………	84
	How spirit flesh and skin are embedded in social structure ………………………………………………………	85
	Figure 1: Skin group pairs as spirit flesh and skin classes ……………………………………………………	87
	Moiety divisions as either spirit or flesh classes ……………………………………………………………………………	88
	The skin totem system of the Kulin Nation ……………………………………………………………………………………………………	90
	Figure 2: Kulin Nation skin totem system ………………………………………………………………………………………………………	91
	Locating family members in the skin totem matrix……………………………………………………………………………………	92
	Other mothers and fathers, other brothers and sisters………………………………………………………………………	94

	Appendix 1
	Mapping your family skin totem relationships ……………………………………………………………………………………………	97

	Appendix 2
	Teaching spirit flesh and skin relationships ……………………………………………………………………………………………	100

	Appendix 3
	Mara Nation skin totem system ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	107

	Appendix 4
	Gunnai Nation skin totem system ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	108
MENU
Back to Sharing Heritage
Back to marngrook
Top of Page